DSWD HIRING 16

NEA has opportunities available to apply

The National Electrification Administration (NEA; Filipino: Pambansang Pangasiwaan ng Elektripikasyon) is a government-owned and controlled corporation (GOCC) attached to the Department of Energy of the Philippines tasked in the full implementation of the rural electrification program (REP) and reinforce the technical capability and financial viability of the 121 rural electric cooperatives (ECs).

Formerly located at the D&E and CDC Buildings, 1050 Quezon Avenue, Paligsahan, their office is now inside Triangle Park at the National Government Center in Quezon City.

Interestingly, National Electrification Administration has vacancies available until January 16, 2023.

One (1) Senior Internal Control Officer B (JG10/ Php 36,619 Monthly Salary)

  • Item No.: 21
  • Place of Assignment: Internal Audit and Quality Standards Management Office – Financial and Special Audit Division (IAQSMO-FSAD)
  • Education: Bachelor’s degree relevant to the job
  • Experience: One (1) year of relevant experience
  • Training: 4 hours of relevant training
  • Eligibility: CS Professional/ Second Level Eligibility

One (1) Internal Control Officer A (JG9/ Php 31,320 Monthly Salary)

  • Item No.: 24
  • Place of Assignment: Internal Audit and Quality Standards Management Office – Financial and Special Audit Division (IAQSMO-FSAD)
  • Education: Bachelor’s degree relevant to the job
  • Experience: None required
  • Training: None required
  • Eligibility: CS Professional/ Second Level Eligibility

One (1) Senior Internal Control Officer B (JG10/ Php 36,619 Monthly Salary)

  • Item No.: 31
  • Place of Assignment: Internal Audit and Quality Standards Management Office – Financial and Special Audit Division (IAQSMO-FSAD)
  • Education: Bachelor’s degree relevant to the job
  • Experience: One (1) year of relevant experience
  • Training: 4 hours of relevant training
  • Eligibility: CS Professional/ Second Level Eligibility

One (1) Division Manager A (JG12/ Php 80,003 Monthly Salary)

  • Item No.: 182
  • Place of Assignment: Information Technology and Communication Services Department – Information Technology and Systems Development Division (ITCSD-ITSDD)
  • Education: Master’s degree or Certificate in Leadership and Management from the CSC
  • Experience: 4 years of supervisory/ management experience
  • Training: 40 hours of supervisory/ management learning and development intervention
  • Eligibility: CS Professional/ Second Level Eligibility

One (1) Management Information Systems/Development Chief A (JG12/ Php 80,003 Monthly Salary)

  • Item No.: 183
  • Place of Assignment: Information Technology and Communication Services Department – Information Technology and Systems Development Division (ITCSD-ITSDD)
  • Education: Bachelor’s degree relevant to the job
  • Experience: 4 years of relevant experience
  • Training: 24 hours of relevant training
  • Eligibility: CS Professional/ Second Level Eligibility

One (1) Senior Industrial Relations Development Officer A (JG11/ Php 46,725 Monthly Salary)

  • Item No.: 344
  • Place of Assignment: Institutional Development Department – Organization and Management Development Division (IDD-OMDD)
  • Education: Bachelor’s degree
  • Experience: 2 years of relevant experience
  • Training: 8 hours of relevant training
  • Eligibility: CS Professional/ Second Level Eligibility

One (1) Records Officer C (JG8/ Php 27,000 Monthly Salary)

  • Item No.: 348
  • Place of Assignment: Institutional Development Department – Organization and Management Development Division (IDD-OMDD)
  • Education: Bachelor’s degree
  • Experience: None required
  • Training: None required
  • Eligibility: CS Professional/ Second Level Eligibility

Note: These positions are open to all qualified applicants regardless of gender, civil status, disability, ethnicity and/ or religion.

Next-In-Rank employees should signify their interest by applying in writing otherwise they waive their rights to the vacant position/s.

How to Apply

All interested applicants who meet the qualification requirements of the vacant position/s are enjoined to submit the following documents (in PDF file format) to the Human Resource Management Division (HRMD) of the National Electrification Administration (NEA), not later than the close of office hours on January 16, 2023.

  1. Application letter; (please indicate position title, item number, and department/office)
  2. Updated Personal Data Sheet (CS Form No. 212 revised 2017) and Work Experience Sheet (CS Form No. 212 Attachment)
    • All items should be answered properly and completely, in accordance with CSC MC No. 12 s. 2017 (https://bit.ly/CSCMC16s2017)
    • With recent passport-sized ID picture and signature on each page;
  3. Certificate of duties and responsibilities relevant to the position applied for, if applicable;
  4. Copy of IPCR (latest rating period prior to the application, for those employed in government);
  5. Potential assessment rating form (HRMPSB Form No. 2-A or HRMPSB Form No. 2-B, whichever is applicable) signed by immediate supervisor (for employed applicants only);
  6. Copy of authenticated eligibility or updated PRC ID (whichever is applicable); and
  7. Transcript of Records (non-NEA applicants)

All documents should be based on the forms provided by the HRMD. Forms may be downloaded in the NEA website. (click here)

Applicants may also send their applications thru or email address recruitment@nea.gov.ph. Previous applicants to republished position/s need to submit their application letter, updated Personal Data Sheet with Work Experience Sheet and copy of latest IPCR if applicable.

NOTE: ONLY APPLICATIONS RECEIVED UNTIL THE DEADLINE WITH COMPLETE AND CLEAR JOB APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS WILL BE ACCEPTED. THE ACCOMPLISHEMENT OF ALL FORMS SUCH AS THE PERSONAL DATA SHEET AND WORK EXPERIENCE SHEET SHOULD BE IN ACCORDANCE WITH REQUIRED FORMAT.

History

The National Electrification Administration (NEA) was created on August 4, 1969 by virtue of Republic Act 6038 that boldly declared as a national policy objective the total electrification of the Philippines on an area coverage basis. In the same year, USA granted the first loan for RE program in the amount of $3.5 Million which financed the two (2) pilot projects. A dashing Senator from Mindanao, Emmanuel N. Pelaez, collaborated with NRECA's counsel, Atty. William “Bell” Crisp who shared his legal expertise in customizing the American rural electrification model to fit the Philippine situation. The result was Senate Bill No.1136. In the sponsorship speech delivered on the Floor of the Senate, on May 21, 1969, the distinguished Senate pointed out that only 22.9% or ¼ of all the homes had electricity. Out of these, 62.8% were in the cities. In the rural areas, only 5.8% of homes were electrified. In 1969, the era of rural electrification began with RA 6038 on August 4, 1969 creating the National Electrification Administration (NEA) and declaring as a national policy the total electrification of the Philippines using the area concept through the organization and development of tasked with cooperatives (ECs) tasked with providing adequate, reliable and low-cost electricity, Thus, the beginning of the NEA Story. This era began with the newly enacted law giving primacy to elected cooperatives because of their cooperative character, nonprofit natural and heavy financial burdens, Still, the law also provided. That the Senate shall promote, encourage and assist all public service entities engaged in supplying electricity on an area coverage basis. President Ferdinand E. Marcos aptly declared the program as a new dimension to the Philippine infrastructure program. He emphasized that total electrification cannot be achieved unless the Government giver its continued and determined support. On the August 31, 1969, the United States of America granted a load—the fist ever for rural electrification--of $3.5 million at 1% interest per annum payable in 30 years, to the Philippine Government which was, in turn, relent to the two electric cooperative which proved successful led to the adoption of the program on a national scale.

Origin of the Philippine Electrification

As a nation, the Philippines with its 7,101 islands, 2,800 of which are populated, experienced its first taste of electrification in 1890. Three lamps were installed along a main thoroughfare in the City of Manila.

From1890 to the late 1960s, power generation and distribution were largely controlled by private entities. For the most part, the government was regulating electric installation. In 1936, Commonwealth Act 120 created the National Power Corporation (NPC) and tasked it with developing the country’s hydropower potential. Primarily, the Manila Electric Company (MERALCO) was the largest privately-owned electric utility which contributed to the country’s total generation capacity. Secondarily, there were small generating systems that were installed which were owned by private operators and local government units (LGUs). Due to the profit-orientation of the private utilities, electrification was limited to high-density urban areas only where electric utility operations were considered viable.

With this condition, the government realized that the rural areas were deprived from being program beneficiaries. Thus, agricultural and industrial development in the countryside was snail-paced. The government realized further that the promotion and acceleration of such development could be attained through the provision of cheap and dependable supply of power.

Beginning of Rural Electrification

Due to the inadequacy of power service, the need for an agency to oversee the installation of countryside electrical systems was felt.

It is on this score that the Electrification Administration (EA) was created. In 1960, Republic Act (RA) 2717 was enacted to carry out the country’s electrification policy. The agency was authorized P25 million to be loaned out to the electric utility operators for financing the construction and operation of generating plants, electric transmission and distribution systems for the furnishing of electric energy, particularly in the rural areas.

Despite of the agency’s creation, it was still to be many years before clean, efficient and conventional energy would reach most of the rural Philippines. The electric utility operators deemed that although extending services to the rural areas may be technically feasible; it was far from being practicable. As businessmen, they would see no profits to be made in electrifying sparsely populated countryside and even in upgrading their services. As late as the ‘60s, most of the remote areas were bereft of electricity, some of which enjoyed it only for six to eight hours and only after nightfall. This condition kept the rural economy tied entirely and exclusively to agriculture. Factories and businesses naturally preferred to locate in the cities where electric power was easily acquired.

In 1964, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) conducted a survey of the country’s power situation. Finding that the electrification program had been moving quite slowly as private utility operators continued to ignore serving the rural areas, the study recommended the adoption of the rural electric cooperative system of the United States.

In 1966, during the state visit to the United States of then President Ferdinand E. Marcos, arrangements were made for USAID assistance in the Philippine Rural Electrification Program. A contract with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) of the United States was executed. The NRECA made feasibility studies for pilot projects. Two Rural Electric Cooperatives (ECs) were set up, one in Mindanao and the other in the Visayas. These were the Misamis Oriental Rural Electric Service Cooperative, Inc. (MORESCO) and the Victorias-Manapla-Cadiz Rural Electric Service Cooperative, Inc. (VRESCO), respectively.

The first EC, MORESCO got power from the nearby Maria Cristina hydroelectric plants of NPC. VRESCO, on the other hand, had to generate its own power through generators. Both of these ECs became models of future cooperatives.

Source: NEA

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